Texting and Driving in California

texting and driving

It doesn’t matter how many images of horrific wrecks insurance companies and auto agencies put out to warn drivers of the dangers of texting and driving, we still do it. Each of us has this weird impression that surely sending a quick response to the most recent incoming text won’t do anything wrong.

Since the warnings aren’t enough to convince the vast majority of us to stop texting while we’re behind the wheel, California lawmakers have decided to pass laws that they hope will discourage the dangerous habit.

The issue of texting and driving is covered by California’s distracted driving laws. These laws weren’t altered in 2021, but it’s always a good idea to review them. Especially if your budget and driving record can’t take the hit of another ticket.

At this point, the ...

Loitering in California

Loitering in California

For the most part, loitering is harmless and doesn’t bother anyone, but there are times when someone will object to your behavior. When this happens, the irritated person may call the cops. It’s at this point that you learn the legal ins and outs of loitering in California.

Loitering in California is a little difficult to define. Loitering is essentially the act of hanging out somewhere when you don’t have any particular need to be in that place. Sitting in a restaurant and chatting with friends even though you are no longer eating, lingering at the bus stop so you can people watch, and soaking up the sun in a convenience store parking lot are all examples of loitering.

The issue of loitering in California became a legal aspect of interest in 1983 when the U.S...

Public Intoxication Laws in California

Public Intoxication Laws in California

Everyone knows that if you get behind the wheel and drive your car after you’ve had too much to drink that you’ll be arrested and have to deal with some serious legal consequences. What you might not know is that alcohol can get you into trouble even if you don’t plan on driving.

If you’re severely drunk (or under the influence of drugs) while in public, you could be charged with public intoxication in California.

The good news is that the police probably won’t arrest you just because you’ve had one too many and are walking home. However, if you’re the type of person who makes strange choices when you’re drunk, you’re night out could end with you getting locked in a jail cell.

In California, the police can arrest you if you for public intoxication if you’re in public and...

What Happens to Debts Of A Deceased Person?

San Francisco Bail Bonds

Nothing about the death of a loved one is easy. Not only do you have to deal with your grief and sense of loss, but it also won’t be long before you find yourself trying to straighten out their finances and learning what debts they still owe. Figuring out the finances and making sure all outstanding debts are paid is stressful, time-consuming, and confusing.

The first thing you need to figure out which of your loved one’s debts have to be honored and which became irrelevant when your loved one passed.

Are You Responsible for the Debts?

While very few debts simply disappear when a loved one has passed, it’s unlikely that you’ll have to dip into your own bank account to pay them off. The only time you’ll have to dip into your own money is when you co-signed on a loan with the loved...

Understanding Assault with a Deadly Weapon

Understanding Assault with a Deadly Weapon

Assault with a deadly weapon is basically what it sounds like. It means you are accused of assaulting someone and at the time you had something that could have been considered a deadly weapon. Like most legal issues, assault with a deadly weapon isn’t as simple as we would like it to be.

What is a Deadly Weapon?

The first issue that comes up during assault with deadly weapon trials is if the object was deadly. Most of us hear deadly weapons and we instantly think of things like guns and knives. We don’t usually realize that many of the things that are simply laying around your house could be considered a deadly weapon in the right situation. In the heat of the moment, a shoe, pen, heavy beer bottle, or dog leash could become a deadly weapon...

The Difference Between Manslaughter and Involuntary Manslaughter

The Difference Between Manslaughter and Involuntary Manslaughter

From a legal standpoint, manslaughter is, “the unlawful killing of a human being without any malice aforethought.”

What that means is that something you did resulted in the death of someone else. What separates it from other types of murder charges is that you didn’t actively think you were going to do something that would trigger their death. There was zero premeditation.

What is Manslaughter

Manslaughter, which is sometimes referred to as voluntary manslaughter, happens when the court rules that the victim provoked you. A perfect example of this is if you’re at a bar and someone is harassing you. If you decide you’ve had enough and punch your heckler and they die, that’s manslaughter.

You didn’t plan on murdering the person and their actions provoked the attack, but at the ...

Finding Out If A Person Has an Arrest Warrant

Finding Out If A Person Has an Arrest Warrant

Whether you’re looking because you’re worried an arrest warrant has been filed against you or because you need to know about a person you’re dealing with, everyone has their own reasons for needing to know how to go about finding out if a person has an arrest warrant.

The most common reasons to find out if a person has an arrest warrant include:

  • You want to know if the police are going to knock on your door
  • You’re worried about what might happen if a traffic cop pulls you over
  • You need to run a background check on a potential renter/employee

The good news is that it’s not difficult to find out if a person has an arrest warrant. All you need is a computer, a reliable internet connection, a third party website that deals with a criminal history, and some basic information about ...

Yes, Your Tax Return can be Used Towards Bail

At San Francisco Bail Bond Store, we are often asked if tax return money can be applied towards bail bond payments and the answer is always yes. Once the return is successfully transferred into your bank account, it is 100% your money and up to you to decide what you want to do with it. This means you can use it to pay for a bail bond.

If you wish to use your tax return money for a bail bond payment, then you can write a check or send in cash. San Francisco Bail Bond Store also has a convenient and secure online payment portal if you wish to use a debit or credit card for payment.

Make sure you stay on top of your bail bond payment plan. Keep receipts of transactions and payments. Do not fall behind because this would jeopardize the bail bond and your loved one’s freedom.

Just like y...

Can You Use Your Tax Return for Bail?

Like any money that is yours, give extra thought into what you want to do with your tax return when it comes in. Will you save or invest it? Can you afford to splurge and treat yourself to something nice? Do you need to use it to pay off rent, bills, or your bail bond payments?

If you find that you have been a little tight on money in the last few weeks and months before your tax return came in, then spending this money wisely is exactly what you should be thinking about. Getting arrested and posting bail with a bail bond could be the reason your money has been stretched a thinner than usual. You know you need to pay your bail bond payments on time, so use your tax return to catch up or even get ahead.

San Francisco Bail Bond Store will help you keep track of your bail bond payments and ...

Yes, Use Your Tax Return for Bail Money

Before you go spending all the money you got from your tax return, think about some wiser possible uses for this money. Things like rent, utility bills, or even your bail bond payments. These are bills that you should never fall behind on and at this moment, your bail bond payments may even out-prioritize your rent.

Your recent arrest is the reason you have bail bond payments to make. Instead of living in jail until your trial, you posted bail with a bail bond from San Francisco Bail Bond Store. This allowed you to be released from jail and return home to go about your normal life. A bail bond costs only 10% of the full bail amount and you are set up on a payment plan so you pay off that 10% over the course of several months...