Don’t Get a DUI This Thanksgiving

Don’t Get a DUI This Thanksgiving

Don’t Get a DUI This Thanksgiving

Halloween came and went and Thanksgiving will be here before you know it. The holiday season is upon us and that means a lot of parties, family, and drinking. This is a great time of year and is usually filled with lots of fun. Unfortunately, some people make a single decision that can ruin the festivities for everyone.

Alcohol is often very prominent at parties, and so naturally, people tend to get drunk at holiday parties. On its own, this is fine. The trouble comes when someone who has been drinking decides they are going to drive themselves home. They think things like they’re fine, or just buzzed, and then take their keys and leave. Sometimes they make it home. Other times they don’t.

Drunk Driving Is Illegal

Drinking and driving is illegal, and everyone knows that. However, people still do it anyways, and it is incredibly dangerous.

When a person has consumed alcohol, operating normally becomes difficult. Alcohol dulls the senses and distorts a person’s thinking. Due to this, when a person drives drunk, they are less capable of driving safely. They struggle to drive straight, stop properly, and avoid any surprises that are sent their way. This is why drunk drivers get into so many accidents.

Driving under the influence (DUI) is illegal in California under several different laws. The main law being Vehicle Code (VC) 23152. This law states that it is illegal for any person to drive a vehicle while under the influence of drugs or alcohol. This is especially true if the person has a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.08% or greater.

DUI Checkpoints

Law enforcement agencies are always keeping an eye out for drunk drivers. They want to get them off of the road as quickly as they can before an accident occurs. They will pull over any vehicle that they suspect may be driven by a drunk driver.

Around days where there tends to be a lot of partying, law enforcement agencies kick things up a notch. Instead of just waiting to stumble upon a drunk driver, they setup checkpoints near popular areas to try and catch the driver in the act.

DUI checkpoints are often posted in advance to give people plenty of warning and the option to avoid them if they want. At the checkpoint, cars will have to wait their turn to speak with an officer. When an officer is ready, they will signal for a driver to pull forward. From there, the officer will ask a few questions, such as:

  • Where are you going?
  • Where are you coming from?
  • Have you been drinking tonight?